Wednesday, September 16, 2009

more from salem

Nestled in the garden behind the Gardner-Pingree House at 128 Essex Street in Salem is a hidden treasure ~ the Derby-Beebe Summer House. Designed by Samuel McIntire and built in 1799, it is one of the finest examples of Adams-esque Federal architecture in Massachusetts. The one-room building, originally located on the grounds of the Beebe Farm in Wakefield, was acquired by the Peabody Essex Museum and moved to its present location where it now keeps company with the afore-mentioned quince tree. It should also be noted that it is one of only two surviving summer houses designed by McIntire ~ the other, the Derby Summer House, was built in 1793 and is presently located in Danvers.

And tomorrow ~ a literary house tour (of sorts)! Hmmm...I wonder if you can guess.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Lovely - I can picture you cavorting "en gaulle" within such a summer house. KDM

Style Court said...

Love at first sight. Those green doors!

bwemerson said...

Janet, I was there just a few days ago! How did I miss you, LOL...

The two McIntire summer houses are so amazing, are they not Something about the chaste wooden New England neoclassical. I often stop in Danvers on the way back to Maine, just for the repeated pleasure of looking at the Derby Summer house, just a mile off the highway.

Did you happen to see the Peabody-Essex museum's wonderful McIntire exhibit a couple of years ago?

Stacy said...

came here by way of stylecourt and am so happy I did. love this building, book selections etc!!

pve design said...

that's all i need, the perfect studio....and spot to read.

Janet said...

Brad!?!?! Eeeeeee...I need to start coordinating with you. I adore that you go to Danvers just to visit the summer house. Alas, I missed the McIntire exhibition, but I do have the catalogue.

Stacy ~ thanks for stopping by, and welcome!

pve ~ I can just see you in there. The door is green, after all!

andrew1860 said...

This little temple is amazing!!! I was in Salem last August. Salem has some of the best preserved Federal Architecture in America!!!