Thursday, June 17, 2010

on northern light


A few bits from inside "De Hoop" (the hope) windmill in Loenen ~ used for milling grain, not draining water. I was so entranced by the beautiful quality of light inside, creating an endless series of rustic Dutch still lifes, that I neglected to take a photograph of the mill itself. But, oh the power of wind! It is tremendous.

I was told that there were three classic Dutch experiences not to be missed ~ windmills, tulips, and raw young herring ~ all of which I enjoyed with gusto! Okay, the herring: it was a little tough to take in theory, but not nearly as unappealing in practice.

Cheers!

10 comments:

BWS said...

Beautiful once again. Thank you.

Blue said...

To hell with the tulips and the windmills - give me the raw herring every time. Would that it were available here in Atlanta. To sit by the cold, cold North Sea, contemplating how there can be so many grays from horizon to shore, and whilst the answer collects itself, chomp on an broodje nieuwe haring and then head up the beach towards an icy pils - now, that's life!

smilla4blogs said...

A beautiful post, Janet. How I would love to experience the windmill and the light!

Blue, you could be a Mainer at heart!

home before dark said...

What a delight to nibble and nosh this morning of hideous midwestern heat and humidity with not a breeze (we have it 1's and 0's—storms or nothing). With what libation was that herring tossed down...would need many to get to herring gusto. So lovely to see your photos again.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

sounds fishy to me.......*grin*

Janet said...

BWS ~ thank you!

Blue ~ I really do love all that raw fish (must be my Scandinavian blood). I throughly enjoyed the herring and the endless shades of grey.

Mom ~ thank you too!

hbd ~ I was in fact sipping a dry Reisling when I gulped down that fish. A perfect combination in my book...though my Dutch colleagues would argue for Genever.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

I've been thinking about light now all day (albeit also for a work project) and the northern light really IS the best. Why else would artists prefer their studios to always face north? Even in Carmel last week, while on a tour, it was pointed out that for each different artist's studio, northern exposure was always chosen. For this reason, I think an avid gardener and an artist would be a perfect couple. One could have their studio on the north of the house while the gardener could have a 'green' room or conservatory on the south!
I'll choose the north every time. No harsh southern/western light for me, please.

Janet said...

North light is the most constant. Combine that with northern light...and wow. Funny that you should mention artists' studios ~ at the very end of the trip I went on my own to Rembrandthuis and was quite taken by his studio. Which, of course, faces north.

Emile de Bruijn said...

Very Vermeerish, the light in these photos. Living in Wiltshire with its generally milky skies, I miss the clarity of the Dutch light.

Janet said...

Emile ~ thank you. We have the same clairty of light in Maine too...I really miss it living down south!